Masmanidis identifies neurons involved in Pavlovian response

News

Sep 19, 2017

A recent study led by Samantha Butler in the Department of Neurobiology at UCLA has overturned a common belief about how a certain class of proteins in the spinal cord regulate the formation of nervous system cells—called neurons—during embryonic development. These findings could one day inform the creation of stem cell-based therapies that restore the sense of touch in paralyzed patients.
The study was published in the journal eLife, which was founded in part by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

Bone morphogenetic proteins—also known as BMPs—play a key role in human...

Aug 04, 2017

After a lengthy illness, our colleague and friend, John Lu passed away at the UCLA Ronald Regan Medical Center. John had a long career at UCLA and had a joint appointment in the Departments of Neurobiology and Obstetrics & Gynecology. He was a reproductive neuroendocrinologist and was a founding member of the Laboratory of Neuroendocrinology along with Charles “Tom” Sawyer, Roger Gorski, Arthur Arnold and Anna Taylor. John received his PhD from Michigan State University, and after a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Pittsburg, he came west, first to UC San Diego and then...

May 15, 2017

11th Annual Dynamics of Neural Microcircuits Symposium

Thursday, May 18th, 2017

9 am - 5 pm, NRB Auditorium

Apr 25, 2017

Meera Pratap, Ph.D., Researcher in Neurobiology publishes NATURE article on, “Antisense oligonucleotide therapy for spinocerebellar ataxia type 2.” Nature, April 20, 2017, http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v544/n7650/abs/nature22044.html

Apr 19, 2017

New research by scientists at the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA overturns a long-standing paradigm about how axons — thread-like projections that connect cells in the nervous system — grow during embryonic development. The findings of the study, led by Samantha Butler, Associate Professor of Neurobiology, could help scientists replicate or control the way axons grow, which may be applicable for diseases that affect the nervous system, such as diabetes, as well as injuries that sever nerves...

Apr 12, 2017

Arnold “Arne” Scheibel was born in New York City in 1923 where he lived for the first 24 years of his life. He did his undergraduate work at Columbia College and received his Doctor of Medicine degree from Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons in 1946. Though initially interested in cardiology, Dr. Schiebel perceived an apparent pervasiveness of emotional factors in cardiac disease patterns. This led him to the field of psychiatry. After a year of psychiatric residency training at Washington University in St. Louis, he entered the Army as a medical officer and received further...

Apr 03, 2017

Prof. Jack Feldman publishes Science paper on “Breathing control center neurons that promote arousal in mice” (http://science.sciencemag.org/content/355/6332/1411)

Feb 20, 2011

The Feb. 20 Chronicle of Higher Education highlighted experiences by UCLA scientists who have been targeted by anti–animal research extremists’ harassment and violent attacks. David Jentsch, professor of psychiatry; Dario Ringach, professor of neurobiology; Marie-Francoise Chesselet, Charles H. Markham Professor of Neurology and chair of neurobiology; and Kevin Reed, vice chancellor for legal affairs, were quoted. “One Animal Researcher Refuses to Hide”

http://chronicle.com/article/The-...

Jan 26, 2011

Dr. Alcino Silva, professor of neurobiology at the David Geffen School of Medicine and a professor of psychiatry at the Semel Institute, commented Jan. 26 in Science on a new study identifying a naturally occurring hormone that boosts memory retention in animals.

http://news.sciencemag.org/sciencenow/2011/01/growth-hormone-also-a-memory-boo.html